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The history of the kings of Rome. by Dyer, Thomas Henry

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Published by Kennikat Press in Port Washington, N.Y .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Rome

Subjects:

  • Rome -- History -- To 510 B.C

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementWith a prefatory dissertation on its sources and evidence.
SeriesKennikat classics series
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDG233 .D9 1971
The Physical Object
Paginationcxxxv, 440 p.
Number of Pages440
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5313917M
ISBN 100804611998
LC Control Number72105824

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Romulus ruled as the first King of Rome from - BC. According to Livy, he populated Rome with fugitives from other countries and gave them wives abducted from the Sabine tribe. He was said to have vanished in a thunderstorm and was later worshiped as the god Quirinus. The history of Italy and Rome from the Bronze Age to the Punic Wars ( BC). Rome: Day One by Andrea Carandini, translated by Stephen Sartarelli. The author, an archaeologist, argues that Rome's legendary king Romulus was a real person who founded the city in the eighth century BC. Romulus was Rome's first king and after him there were 6 more kings. The period traditionally lasted for years ( BC) and is known about through the historian Livy who compiled his Great History of Rome in a single narrative during the rule of Augustus, which indicates that he ascertained his information through various myths and legends. The History of Ancient Rome I n the regional, restless, and shifting history of continental Europe, the Roman Empire stands as a towering monument to scale and stability; at its height, it stretched from Syria to Scotland, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Black Sea, and it .

Originally composed in Latin, The History of the Kings of Britain by Geoffrey of Monmouth claims to be a history of Britain’s kings from the island’s founding by Trojan descendent Brutus in BCE, to the Britons’ abandonment of the island in the seventh century CE. The text first appeared in the s and was immediately popular, inspiring retellings and adaptations by writers and artists through the centuries. Geoffrey of Monmouth's "History of the Kings of Britain" (as it is usually called) was, during the Middle Ages, one of the most influential books yet written in Britain/5(56). The King of Rome was the chief magistrate of the Roman Kingdom. According to legend, the first king of Rome was Romulus, who founded the city in BC upon the Palatine Hill. Seven legendary kings are said to have ruled Rome until BC, when the last king was overthrown. These kings ruled for an average of 35 years. The kings after Romulus were not known to be dynasts and no reference is Appointer: Curiate Assembly. Genre/Form: History: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Dyer, Thomas Henry, History of the kings of Rome. Port Washington, N.Y., Kennikat Press [].

1. It 1 is of a Rome henceforth free that I am to write the history —her civil administration and the conduct of her wars, her annually elected magistrates, the authority of her laws supreme over all her citizens. [2] The tyranny of the last king made this liberty all the more welcome, for such had been the rule of the former kings that they might not undeservedly be counted as founders of.   The Earliest of Rome’s Seven Kings. Romulus was the first of the seven kings of Rome. Founded with bloodshed and hate, Romulus' slaying of his twin brother Remus solidified him as the sole leader of the new country he chose to found on what would later be known as the Palatine : Riley Winters. The history of the kings of Rome; with prefatory dissertation on its sources and evidence by Dyer, Thomas Henry, Pages: Books of Kings, two books of the Hebrew Bible or the Protestant Old Testament that, together with Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, and 1 and 2 Samuel, belong to the group of historical books (Deuteronomic history) written during the Babylonian Exile (c. bc) of the Jews. (In most Roman .